Stonecipher Symposium focuses on homeland security issues

Sacrifice, special training and secrecy have prepared U.S. Special Operations to battle challenges as war in Iraq intensifies. Retired four-star Gen. Carl Stiner will talk about the role of Special Operations and the nation's war against terrorism at 7 p.m., Monday, March 24, in Derryberry Auditorium as the keynote speaker in this year's Stonecipher Symposium on Technology, Communication and Culture at Tennessee Tech University.

Stiner is uniquely qualified to lead the symposium with its focus on homeland security. A former Commander in Chief of the U.S. Special Operations Command, he commanded the Army’s premier contingency strike forces and counterterrorist forces; planned and led all forces in the liberation of Panama and the capture of Manuel Noriega; and was also involved with all Special Operations support for Operation Desert Storm.

His keynote address, "The History of What Led to the Attack of September 11," will begin this year's symposium, an event that has seen several schedule changes due to the timing of recent events in Iraq and invited participants who play key roles in the U.S. effort. The public is invited.

Stiner, a 1958 Tennessee Tech graduate and native of LaFollette, Tenn., served a 35-year military career. Following retirement, he has continued to serve as a military advisor, consultant and teacher. He is a senior mentor/teacher at the Joint Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Va., and at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.

While continuing to be involved in other national and civil activities, Stiner also works with Future Warfighting Experiments as a senior mentor in order to determine how the military should be prepared to defend U.S. interests in 2015 and beyond.
Last year, Stiner collaborated with best-selling author Tom Clancy to write Shadow Warriors, an account of the U.S. Special Operations forces.

"This is the most complete book ever written on the subject," Stiner said. "It has been written to give readers a better understanding and feel for the utility of these forces to tackle the current challenges we’re facing in this war against terrorism."
Stiner himself was trained in Jump School and Ranger School and also received Green Beret training, and he says that today, Special Operations soldiers are trained for a broader range of missions. Special reconnaissance, combat search and rescue, disaster relief and peacekeeping are just a few of the missions in which these troops are involved.

According to Stiner, the book is a completely factual depiction of the evolution of the Special Operations forces from World War II to the present. Readers have been told as much as possible to "educate them as to what these quiet professionals are made of and how important they are to our nation now and for the future," Stiner said.

The sixth annual Stonecipher Symposium, to be held Monday-Tuesday, March 24-25, will feature Stiner among other military and governmental leaders and eminent researchers and thinkers who will discuss the meaning of homeland security. The speakers will also consider the question of personal privacy and how much of it we are willing to sacrifice for the sake of security.
Major Gen. Jerry Humble, director of the Tennessee Office of Homeland Security, and James Albaugh, president and CEO of Integrated Systems of The Boeing Co., will be among the noted participants.

Other presenters include Rebecca Dornbusch, deputy director of the International Biometric Industry Association; Kathleen Carley, director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Change at Carnegie Mellon University; Clyde Wayne Crews Jr., director of Technology Policy at the Cato Institute; and David McIntyre, deputy director of the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security. On Tuesday, March 25, Research Electronics International of Cookeville will demonstrate modern information-gathering technology.


All events are free and open to the public. Presentations will be held in the OVC Room of the Roaden University Center, and keynote addresses will be held in Derryberry Auditorium. Due to the uncertain international situation, the schedule of events is dynamic. Please visit www.tntech.edu/stonecipher for up-to-date schedule information or call (931) 372-3507. The current schedule is listed below:

Monday, March 24
7:00 p.m. Keynote Address
Retired Four-Star General Carl Stiner
former Commander in Chief of the United States Special Operations Command
Book signing with General Carl Stiner, who co-authored Shadow Warriors with Tom Clancy, will follow the keynote address.

Tuesday, March 25
9:30 a.m.
Dr. David McIntyre
deputy director of the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Dr. Kathleen Carley
director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Change at Carnegie Mellon University
1:30-2:00 p.m.
New Technology Showcase featuring a display of modern information-gathering technology by Research Electronics International of Cookeville
2:00-2:50 p.m.
Mr. James Albaugh
president and CEO of Integrated Defense Systems of The Boeing Co.
3:00-4:15 p.m. Panel Discussion: Information Gathering & Privacy
Ms. Rebecca Dornbusch
deputy director of the International Biometric Industry Association, a trade association developed to advance and support the international interests of the biometrics industry
Mr. Clyde Wayne Crews Jr.
director of Technology Policy at the Cato Institute

7:00 p.m.
Panel Discussion: Open Forum
Panelists

General Carl Stiner
Major General Jerry Humble, director of the Tennessee Office of Homeland Security
Kathleen Carley
Tom Jones from REI
Rebecca Dornbusch
Clyde Wayne Crews Jr.