Seven TTU psychology students present research in Chicago

Posted by Lori Shull - Wednesday, June 27 2012
lshull@tntech.edu

 

Seven Tennessee Tech psychology students recently presented their research at the 24th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science in Chicago.

“Students presenting their research at this national, actually international convention of the APS demonstrates to our students that the research projects they have taken from conceptualization to final reporting are of the quality expected of Ph.D. students," TTU psychology professor Matthew J. Zagumny said. "It provides them with a context to understand that the things they are learning to do here at Tech prepares them very well for graduate studies in psychological science.”

Alyssa Stranz gave a presentation called "Connection between neurotic love styles and mood in college students" and Callimarie Bell presented her research, "A synthesis of the social-ecological and theory of planned behavior models for exercise motivation." Both presentations were co-authored by associate psychology professor Zac Wilcox.

The other five presented work they co-authored with Zagumny. Katie Pierce, '12, Kayla Adams and Sam Fallos gave a presentation called "Psychometric analysis of the religious identity index." Sara Whisnant, '11, presented her research, "Employer perspective of unemployment in the hiring process: Does length matter?" Another presentation, "Media and length of passage affects memory," was given by Star Crabtree. 

Two of the research studies are being prepared for submission to peer-reviewed scientific journals in psychology with publication expected later this year.

“This really is a great experience for our students to be able to present their research alongside Ph.D. students and professors from around world,” Zagumny said.

The students raised funds to attend the APS convention through the TTU Psychology Club, Psi Chi International honor society in Psychology, 606 Funds and URECA! student travel grant program, chaired by Ed Lisic, chemistry professor. 

 

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