Climatic Effects on Endangered Species

According to the World Wildlife Fund's Web site (http://www.worldwildlife.org/climate/impactsandadaptation.html), "climate is changing rapidly and its effects already are being felt.  The impacts will grow and will profoundly affect us, our kids, grandkids and subsequent generations, and will affect wildlife and everything else we care about.  Our challenge:  to slow climate change, to reduce our vulnerability and to adapt.

In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported the results of its fourth assessment of climate change where it devoted a volume of its assessment to climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. According to the report there is 'observational evidence' that many natural systems on all continents and most oceans are being affected by regional climate changes, particularly temperature increases." 

The Center's researchers have always been concerned about protection of endangered species, especially fish and mussels, but now they're looking more at the effect that climate change can have on these special aquatic populations. 

 The following are endangered species-related research projects activated in the 2012-2013 fiscal year:

 logo_ttualertEndangered Species Research in the 28-Mile-Long Reach Below Green River Dam
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  U.S. Geological Survey

 logo_ttualert Population Demographics of Three Endangered and Four Imperiled Mussel Species in the Duck River, Tennessee
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

logo_ttualertPropagation and Culture of Juvenile Mussels for Restoration Efforts in the Ohio River
K. Moles
Funding by:  U.S. Geological Survey

 logo_ttualertPropagation and Re-establishment of Endangered Tennessee Mussels
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

logo_ttualertResponse of Endangered Mussels to Decreased Flows
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  U.S. Geological Survey

logo_ttualertSummer Roosting Ecology of the Northern Long-Eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis) at Catoosa Wildlife Management Area
B. Carver
Funding by:  Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

 

logo_ttualertHistoric Climatic Effects on Endangered Species Products

 

ARCHIVES

  logo_ttualertEstablish Non-essential Population of Two Endangered Mussel Species in the Lower French Broad River, Tennessee
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  U.S. Geological Survey

logo_ttualert Life History of the Cumberland Papershell (Anodontoides denigrata)
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  U.S. Geological Survey

 logo_ttualert Predicting the Effects on Endangered Mussels from Incremental Decreases in Minimum Flows
J.B. Layzer
Funding by:  U.S. Geological Survey

 

Faculty Involved in Endangered Species Research

 

Tennessee Cooperative Fishery Research Unit Faculty Working with the Center


 BettoliNew

Phil W. Bettoli, Professor and Assistant Unit Leader
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931/372-3086
Pennebaker Hall 205
Research Interests:
  assessing fish stocking programs, biotic integrity and conservation of imperiled fish species in regulated rivers, catch-and-release mortality, dynamics of exploited fish populations, status and conservation of commercially exploited paddlefish and sturgeon

LayzerSmallVersion

James B. Layzer, Professor and Unit Leader
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931/372-3032
Pennebaker Hall 205

Research Interests:  effects of stream regulation on aquatic biota, ecology and conservation of freshwater mussels, restoring and maintaining aquatic biodiversity, ecology of stream fishes

 

Tennessee Technological University Faculty Researchers

Photo of Brian Carver

Brian Carver, Assistant Professor of Biology
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(931) 372-3127
Pennebaker (PENN) 307 Webpage

I am a mammalogist and vertebrate community ecologist.  I teach nonmajors biology courses and courses for biology majors at both the undergraduate and graduate level.  In addition to teaching, I am active in research and serve as major professor to graduate students as well as on committees for other graduate students. 

Photo of Steven Cook

Steven Cook, Professor and Interim Chair
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(931) 372-3194
Pennebaker (PENN) 207A

Expertise in ecology of freshwater invertebrates; fish parasitology; feeding ecology and bioenergetics of freshwater fishes; biotic indices

Photo of Hayden Mattingly

Hayden Mattingly, Professor
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(931) 372-6410

Expertise in freshwater fish and crayfish life history and ecology; conservation biology; endangered species management

 

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