Climatic Effects on Water Resources

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Web site (http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/effects/water/), "'all regions of the world show an overall net negative impact of climate change on water resources and freshwater ecosystems.  Areas in which runoff is projected to decline are likely to face a reduction in the value of the services provided by water resources.  The beneficial impacts of increased annual runoff in other areas are likely to be tempered in some areas by negative effects of increased precipitation variability and seasonal runoff shifts on water supply, water quality and flood risks' (IPCC, 2007).

"The future effects of climate change on water resources in the U.S. and other parts of the world will depend on trends in both climatic and non-climatic factors.  Evaluating these impacts is challenging because water availability, quality and streamflow are sensitive to changes in temperature and precipitation.  Other important factors include increased demand for water caused by population growth, changes in the economy, development of new technologies, changes in watershed characteristics and water management decisions.

"In addition to the typical impacts on water management, climate change introduces an additional element of uncertainty about future water resource management.  Water resources in the United States are heavily managed, and supplies are scarce in some regions of the country.  Strategies have been developed and continue to evolve to address these issues.  Implementation of adaptation measures, such as water conservation, use of markets to allocate water, and the application of appropriate management practices will have an important role to play in determining the impacts of climate change on water resources."

The goal of the Center's work is to protect water resources from the effect of harmful influences like pollution and now, more recently, the climate.  Its researchers are devoted toward that aim and engage in cutting-edge work that touches on those topics. 

References
IPCC, 2007:  Climate Change 2007:  Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability.  Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Parry, Martin L., Canziani, Osvaldo F., Palutikof, Jean P., van der Linden, Paul J., and Hanson, Clair E. (eds.)].  Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1000 pp.

The following are projects activated in the 2012-2013 fiscal year and related to climatic effects on water resources:

logo_ttualertA Satellite-Based Early Warning, Mapping and Post-Disaster Visualization System for Water Resources of Low-Lying Deltas of the Hindu
Kush-Himalayan Region

F. Hossain
Funding by:  NASA

logo_ttualertSatellite Rainfall Uncertainty Estimation Across the Globe for Diverse Hydrologic Applications Using Readily Accessible Geophysical Features
F. Hossain and A. Gebregiorgis
Funding by:  NASA

logo_ttualertUnderstanding Atmospheric Rivers, Terrain and Anthropogenic Land Cover Changes on Storm Modification Around Large Dams Using Multi-Sensor Satellite Data, Cloud Tracking and Numerical Modeling
F. Hossain and A. Woldemichael
Funding by:  NASA

 

logo_ttualert Historic Climatic Effects on Water Resources Products 

Faculty Involved in Climatic Effects on Water Resources

 

Photo of Tania Datta

Tania Datta, Assistant Professor
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(931) 372-3446
Prescott Hall (PRSC) 333Resume/CV

Dr. Datta is a newly appointed faculty member in the Center for Management, Utilization & Protection of Water Resources and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research interests include:

  • Biological Wastewater Treatment Design
  • Environmental Microbiology
  • Bioenergy Production through Anaerobic Processes
  • Resource Recovery from Organic Waste Streams
  • Role of Microorganisms in Natural Aquatic Ecosystems
  • Developing Low-Cost Technologies for Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

Photo of Alfred Kalyanapu

Alfred Kalyanapu, Assistant Professor
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(931) 372-3561
Prescott Hall (PRSC) 334 Webpage
Resume/CV

I am interested in understanding the complex interactions of water with urban areas including energy, climate, infrastructure and sustainability.

Research Topics:

  • Climate Impacts
  • Computational Hydraulics & Hydrology
  • Hydraulic/Hydrologic Modeling
  • Urban Water Management
  • Regional Scale Flood Modeling & Simulation
  • GIS Applications in Water Resources Engineering

 

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