Tip 4

Tip 4: Confusing Pronouns: Antecedent Agreement, Vague or Ambiguous Pronoun Reference

Antecedent Agreement

A pronoun takes the place of a noun. An antecedent is the word, phrase, or clause to which a pronoun refers.
In the following example, the antecedent is in bold and the pronoun is italicized.

  • The teacher forgot her book.

Here her is the pronoun, and teacher is the antecedent.

Checking for Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement
Pronouns and antecedents agree in person—first ( I, we), second (you), or third (he, she, it, they.) They also agree in gender (masculine, feminine, or neuter) and number (singular or plural). Errors in person and gender are rare, so they won’t be discussed here. Most pronoun-antecedent agreement errors have to do with number.

If the antecedent is singular, the pronoun should be singular. If the antecedent is plural, the pronoun should be plural.

  • Pronoun-antecedent agreement error example: The dogs tugged on its leash.
  • Correct: The dogs tugged on their leashes.

Only in the second sentence does the pronoun (their) agree with the antecedent (dogs). (Both are plural.)
Except for careless mistakes or typos, students rarely make the kind of error like the one described above. In the next section, we’ll look at the pronoun-antecedent agreement situations that cause students problems.

The Most Problematic Pronoun-Antecedent Situation

Most agreement problems arise with singular indefinite nouns ( person, student, individual, soldier ) and indefinite pronouns (someone, each, anybody, neither). These words are “indefinite” because they do not definitely refer to males, nor do they definitely refer to females. Because they are singular, they should be followed by the singular pronouns “his or her,” “his or hers,” or “him or her,” depending on context. Rules are changing, however, as people often use plural pronouns such as they or theirs to refer to indefinite singular antecedents to avoid awkward or sexist language.

Sexist Language?

 

Be careful to avoid sexist language when using singular pronouns.

Help readers to concentrate on your message instead of your use of singular pronouns. Years ago, a masculine pronoun (his, he) was acceptable when the gender of a noun could refer to either a man or a woman, but today your writing could be offensive if you use that practice. Don’t suggest, for example, that all teachers are women or all scientists are men. Learn to navigate around this pesky problem with English pronouns.

Problem:

Each doctor should bring his registration papers to the meeting.

(All doctors are not men.)

Acceptable alternatives:

Doctors should bring their registration papers to the meeting.

Each doctor should bring registration papers to the meeting.

Each doctor should bring his or her registration papers to the meeting. (can be awkward)

Each doctor should bring her/his registration papers to the meeting. (can be awkward)

Each doctor should bring their registration papers to the meeting. (see 1st note below)

Notes:

The last option, which mismatches a singular noun (doctor) and a plural pronoun (their), is acceptable to avoid awkward or sexist communication. Be careful, though, when writing important papers, such as formal reports, papers for publication, and employment messages.

Plural pronouns are neither masculine nor feminine in English, so changing the noun to a plural form is usually a good option.

His or her, his/her options are not considered sexist, but they are often awkward, especially if they are used often in a paper.


Vague or Ambiguous Pronoun Reference

Remember that a pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. An ambiguous pronoun reference occurs when it’s not clear what noun a pronoun refers to, as in this example:

  • Ambiguous pronoun reference example: The teacher gave the student her notes. (Does the pronoun her refer to the noun teacher or the noun student?)

A vague pronoun reference occurs in one of two situations: (1) when a pronoun like it, this, that, and which refers to an implied concept or word rather than to a specific, preceding noun; and (2) when a pronoun is used to refer to the object of a prepositional phrase.

  • Example of (1) above: She gave the Red Cross all her money, and this is the reason why she declared bankruptcy. (Here, this refers to an implied concept that could be phrased something like “the fact that she gave the Red Cross all her money” rather to a specific noun.)
  • Better: The fact that she gave the Red Cross all her money explains why she declared bankruptcy.
  • Another example of (1) above: Michelle is a shy person, but she keeps it hidden. (Here, it refers to “shyness,” and although the concept of shyness is implied in this sentence, the word shyness does not appear in it. Thus the pronoun is referring to a noun that isn’t there. That’s not good.)
  • Better: Michelle is a shy person, but she keeps her shyness hidden.
  • A final example of (1) above: Judy Cohen’s error brought her a lawsuit.
    (Here, her must refer to Judy Cohen. However, although the concept that a person named Judy Cohen exists is implied in this sentence, the actual words Judy Cohen do not appear before the pronoun.Cohen’s appears, but not Cohen. Thus, again, the pronoun is referring to a noun that isn’t there.)
  • Better: Her error brought Judy Cohen a lawsuit.
  • Example of (2) above: In the average television drama, it presents a false picture of life. (Here, it refers to drama, and drama is the object of the prepositional phrase “in the average television drama.”)
  • Better: The average television drama presents a false picture of life.
  • Another example of (2) above: In the directions, they said that the small box should be opened last. (Here, they refers to directions, and directions is the object of the prepositional phrase “in the directions.”)
  • Better: The directions say that the small box should be opened last.

Pronoun Exercise
Pronoun Exercise with Answers

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