College of Arts and Sciences

News and Events



National Chemistry Week - October 21-27, 2018


Monday, October 22

  • 5-8pm - Community Outreach Event (RUC Multipurpose Room). Hands-on presentations and activities involving the chemistry of space. Kids of all ages are invited.

Tuesday, October 23

  • 11am - 12pm - ACS Chapter Meeting in Foster Hall 220
  • 5:45pm - 7pm - Science of Mars Webinar in Foster Hall 233 (Refreshments will be provided)

Wednesday, October 24

  • 10am - 2pm - Bake sale in the RUC
  • 5pm - 7pm - Mole Day Race at Tucker Stadium Track (in case of rain, we will move to the Hooper Eblem concourse).

Thursday, October 25

  • 11am - 1pm - Tie dye galaxy t-shirts outside Foster Hall. Create your own space-themed shirts. Shirts are free for all TTU students while supplies last
  • 6pm - 7pm - Green Chemistry Lecture in Foster Hall 233

Friday, October 26

  • 5pm - 7pm - ACS Game Night in Foster 408. Refreshments will be provided. Feel free to bring your own games


For more information about the activities at TTU, email acarroll@tntech.edu. To find out more about the American Chemical Society or National Chemistry Week, please visit https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/outreach/ncw.html?cid=ad_onlinestore_shippingemail_ncw_sep-oct_2016


Race For the Golden Helix 5K - Saturday, October 27

The Race for the Golden Helix 5K will take place on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 10 a.m.! All students are able to run for FREE! In order to guarantee a FREE t-shirt for student runners, you must sign-up by Thursday, Oct. 11. You can still register up until the day of the race, but t-shirts will be on a first come, first served basis! This race is also open to the public! Proceeds from this event are divided to support fundraising for (1)TTU scholarship funds, (2) a Remote Area Medical (RAM) clinic in Cookeville, and the missions of the TTU Chemistry Department student organizations: (3) the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), and (4) the American Chemical Society Student Affiliates (ACS-SA). The ASBMB and ACS-SA will direct funds toward student research and science outreach activities. For more information, please visit our website: http://www.goldenhelix5k.com/ or email Admin@goldenhelix5k.com | (931) 252-2354 





Amanda Carrol Named to National ACS Board

Amanda Carroll, a lecturer in the Department of Chemistry, has been selected to serve on the American Chemical Society Undergraduate Programs Advisory Board. She will serve a 3-year appointment to this board (2018-2021), which reports to the ACS Committee on Education in matters relevant to improving the experience of undergraduate students in the American Chemical Society. Jennifer Nielson, the chair of the education committee, stated "Your familiarity with ACS, your experience in undergraduate education and your involvement in the ACS student chapters program position you well to contribute significantly as a member of the Advisory Board." Carroll is also the advisor of the TTU Student Members of the American Chemical Society, which is ranked in the top 10 percent nationally as an outstanding chapter. She is also the secretary of the Nashville Section of ACS. 


Tech breaks ground for new lab science building

Phonsnasinh, Bailey (Published Monday, November 6, 2017)

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Biology department chair Rob Kissell, chemistry department chair Jeff Boles, College of Arts and Sciences Dean Paul Semmes and President Phil Oldham celebrate the groundbreaking of the new lab science building.

Construction of a new lab sciences building at Tennessee Tech is officially underway and was celebrated at a groundbreaking ceremony Friday afternoon.

“It’s really once in a lifetime opportunity to create something like this,” said university President Phil Oldham. “I couldn’t be prouder of the faculty and staff that have participated in bringing a collection of ideas together in a way that is going to really benefit Tech students for generations to come.”

The $90 million, 160,000-square-feet facility will be the largest academic building at Tech and the its first LEED certified building, housing the chemistry department, a portion of the biology department and lab space for earth sciences, physics and environmental sciences.

The new building replaces Foster Hall and will be the anchor for a new academic quad located immediately north of the Capital Quad residence halls on the site of a current parking lot.

“The people involved in this project have been very dedicated,” said Department of Chemistry Chair Jeff Boles. “They have been, and in some cases continue to be, involved in everything from classroom and laboratory design to flooring and furniture selection.”

A team of more than 40 faculty members worked closely with architects Upland Design Group in Crossville and Bauer-Askew Architecture in Nashville on the building design. Together they have incorporated collaborative spaces unlike any that have ever existed at Tech as part of the building’s design, allowing faculty and students to interact and work together in an unprecedented way.

“President Oldham wanted us to be fearless,” Boles said. “He wanted to be forward-thinking. He wanted us to design something better, something bigger, something ready for tomorrow that not only fostered and supported growth in enrollment but professional growth in faculty, staff and students.”

Design features focus on collaborative space, active learning and “Science on Display,” which is the appropriate use of glass in a building so that people can see what goes on.

“This building can best be described in the experiences that it will make possible,” said Department of Biology Chair Rob Kissell. “Those experiences are going to be transformative experiences, they are going to be enhanced experiences and they are going to be collaborative experiences. The new building will be transformative on campus on many levels.”

Upland Design Group in Crossville and Bauer-Askew Architecture in Nashville previously worked on Bell Hall, home of the Whitson-Hester School of Nursing.

The Christman Company, which also built Ray Morris Hall, home of the Millard-Oakley STEM Center, is the contractor for the building project.

The project was funded by the State of Tennessee in the university’s 2016 budget appropriation.