English

Student Achievements

Spring Fling cake The annual Spring Fling celebrating graduating English majors was held on April 24, 2018. 
College of Arts and Sciences Honors night
College of Arts and Sciences Honors night. Left to right: Kaitlynn Leann Wilbanks (Sophomore, Literature concentration); Khushi Patel (Engineering major, winner of Carroll Viera scholarship, honoring foreign-born student's English acquisition); Dr. Ted Pelton; James Lyle Alder (Junior, Theatre concentration); Katrina Mauk (Freshman, Writing/Language/Genre concentration); Christine Ong (Senior, Professional and Technical Communication concentration)
English 6640: Seminar in 20th Century American Lit For English 6640: Seminar in 20th Century American Lit, six graduate teaching assistants, Dr. Burduck, and Dr. Baker took a trip to Oxford, MS, the place where Faulkner based his fictional world of Yoknapatawpha County. The students visited the house Faulkner based the Compson House off of in his 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury, the house where he wrote the novel As I Lay Dying, and the town square which is mentioned in many of his Yoknapatawpha novels. 
Image result for lsu logo Vicki Davis (TTU MA English ’12) graduated with a PhD in English (Writing and Culture) in 2017 from Louisiana State University, where she also won a university-wide Alumni Association Graduate Teaching Assistant Award. In fall 2017, she took a position as an assistant professor of English at Indiana Tech, in beautiful Fort Wayne, IN.
Charles Acheson (MA '14)has published an article in ImageTexT: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies, vol. 9, no. 1, 2017: "Networking Multivalence Trauma through HolonymicRepresentation in David B.'s Epileptic" (http://www.english.ufl.edu/imagetext/archives/v9_1/acheson/). This article evolved from a chapter in his MA thesis, which was directed by Dr.Tony Baker. Charles is a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Florida's PhD program in English.
  Laura Nealon Laura Nealon (BA '17) began her graduate studies this fall in TTU's English MA program, where she serves as a graduate teaching assistant. 

Congratulations to English majors Shannon Buford, Saylah Johnson, and Kelsey Taylor, whose essays have been published in the inaugural issue of Tennessee Tech's undergraduate research journal, the Journal of Creative Inquiry

Shannon's narrative essay is entitled "Three Chrismases." She originally wrote it in response to an assignment in Professor O'Rourke's ENGL 4440 (Creative Writing: Essay) class.

Saylah's
critical paper is entitled "Faulkner's Elderly Ladies." She originally wrote this essay in response to an assignment in Dr. Burduck’s ENGL 4983 (William Faulkner) class.

Kelsey's critical paper is entitled "Fulfilling Their Fate: Roman Mythological Allusions and Organic Unity in Romeo and Juliet." She originally wrote this essay in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class. Funded by a Creative Inquiry Summer Experience (CISE) Grant, Kelsey conducted further research for this paper at Hodges Library, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and revised the essay into a conference paper, which she presented at The University of Virginia's College at Wise Medieval-Renaissance Conference.

At an awards ceremony during the Department's Spring Fling celebration on April 25, 2017, English major Sarah Foy (left) was awarded an English Endowment Clara Cox Epperson Prose Writing Competition Award (non-fiction, tie for 2nd) for "Dawn." Political Science major Elizabeth Rein (right) was awarded an English Endowment Lora A. Printz Memorial Poetry Prize for "Fountains" and an English Endowment Clara Cox Epperson Prose Writing Competition Award (fiction) for "The Clock that Hangs in My Kitchen Really Ties the Room Together." Sarah and Elizabeth are pictured with Dr. Ted Pelton, Chair, Department of English.

Other 2017 scholarship and award winners (not pictured) include:
  • Shannon Buford, English Endowment Clara Cox Epperson Prose Writing Competition (non-fiction, tie for 2nd) for "Three Christmases"
  • Ryan Goke, English Endowment Lora A. Printz Memorial Poetry Prize (honorable mention) for "The Silent Majority"
  • Chelsea Mathes, William W. Jenkins Creative Writing Scholarship for "Mi Hermana"
  • Christian Sexton, English Endowment Clara Cox Epperson Prose Writing Competition Award (non-fiction, tie for 2nd) for "Game of Attraction"

At an awards ceremony during the Department's Spring Fling celebration on April 25, 2017, the following students, pictured (from left) with Dr. Ted Pelton, Chair, Department of English, received English Endowment Writing Awards for ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020 papers:

  • Brandon Bond for "Class Matters in Education"
  • Lena Albro for "Turning My Life Upside Down"
  • Hannah Friel for "The Winds and the Waves"
  • Will Brewer for "Why Can't I Flip You Off!?"
  • Demi Coleman for "Noise"
Anna Claire Foster (not pictured) also received an award for "How the Earth Came to Be."

English major Hillary Martin will be moving to the Bay Area to begin the M.F.A. in Writing Program at California College of the Arts.

California College of the Arts has awarded Hillary a Merit Scholarship and a Teaching Assistantship.

English major Kelsey Taylor was selected from a very competitive group of student nominees as this year's winner of the College of Arts and Sciences Award for Excellence in Liberal Arts, the top annual recognition for an Arts and Sciences student. The award recognizes Kelsey as the student who best embodies liberal arts values. She received a plaque and $1000.

Kelsey's selection was based on a vote of chairs and faculty from across the College, one representing each department. The award was made formally at the College Honors Evening ceremony on April 17, 2017, in the Tech Pride Room.

Kelsey is the first English major to win the award in thirteen years.

On behalf of the English department faculty and students, Congratulations, Kelsey! 

English major Kelsey Taylor received an Excellence in Creative Inquiry Student Award for outstanding participation in the Creative Inquiry Summer Experience (CISE) Program. She is pictured with Dr. Francis Otuonye, Associate Vice President for Research, at the TTU Research and Creative Inquiry Day Awards Ceremony at the Hooper Eblen Center, April 6, 2017. The award includes a certificate, an engraved paperweight, and $250. 

Kelsey and Dr. Deiter were awarded a 2016 Creative Inquiry Summer Experience (CISE) Grant to conduct literary research on Romeo and Juliet at Hodges Library, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The grant included a summer stipend for Kelsey to revise and expand her paper, "Fulfilling Their Fate: Roman Mythological Allusions and Organic Unity in Romeo and Juliet," for presentation at a conference. In September 2016, funded by an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URECA!) Student Travel Grant, Kelsey presented her paper at The University of Virginia's College at Wise Medieval-Renaissance Conference.

Kelsey's paper is forthcoming as an article in the Journal of Creative Inquiry.

(From left) English majors Kelsey Taylor, Brittney Herman, and Sarah Moore presented their research at TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day, April 5, 2017, in the Tech Pride Room, Roaden University Center.

Kelsey presented a paper she wrote for Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class, and then revised as a Creative Inquiry Summer Experience (CISE) Project. The paper was entitled “Fulfilling Fate: Roman Mythological Allusions and Organic Unity in Romeo and Juliet.” Kelsey received a Best English Undergraduate Project Award at the TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day Awards Ceremony on April 6, 2017.

Brittney 
presented a paper she wrote for Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class, entitled “Star-Crossed Oppression in a Patriarchal Society: Feminist Critique of Romeo and Juliet .” She received a Best English Undergraduate Project Award at the TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day Awards Ceremony on April 6, 2017.


Sarah 
presented a paper she wrote for Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class, entitled “Sacrificial Love and Selfish Love: A Deconstructionist Approach to Romeo and Juliet.

(From left) English M.A. student and Graduate Teaching Assistant Brandi Kriebel and English majors Shannon Buford and Saylah Johnson presented their research at TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day, April 5, 2017, in the Tech Pride Room, Roaden University Center.

Brandi presented a paper she wrote for Dr. Burduck's ENGL 6590 (Seminar in Nineteenth-century American Literature) class, entitled “Curiosity and Fear as Elements of the Sublime in Poe and Hawthorne." She received a Best English Graduate Project Award at the TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day Awards Ceremony on April 6, 2017.

Shannon presented a paper she wrote for Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class, entitled “‘The Weaker Vessels’: Gender Roles in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.” She received a Best English Undergraduate Project Award at the TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day Awards Ceremony on April 6, 2017.

Saylah presented a paper she wrote for Dr. Burduck’s ENGL 4983 (William Faulkner) class, entitled “Faulkner’s Elderly Ladies.”

(From left) English M.A. students and Graduate Teaching Assistants Tyler McNew, Olivia Jolley, and Cody Matthews presented their research at TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day, April 5, 2017, in the Tech Pride Room, Roaden University Center.

Tyler presented a paper he wrote for Dr. Deiter's ENGL 6000 (Introduction to Graduate Studies) class, entitled “Inside Shakespeare’s Monomaniac Closet: Romeo and Tybalt’s Homosexual Panic.”

Olivia presented part of her M.A. thesis, directed by Dr. Shirley Laird, “Nature & Race in The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings.

Cody presented part of his M.A. thesis, directed by Dr. Paulina Bounds, “Eliza’s Rising Consciousness in Pygmalion.” He received a Best English Graduate Project Award at the TTU Student Research and Creative Inquiry Day Awards Ceremony on April 6, 2017.

English major Lindsey Pippin presented a Research and Creative Inquiry Day poster, which she created in Dr. Laura Cruz's HON 4013 (Colloquium: The Idea of a University: Past, Present, and Future) course, on April 6, 2017. Her project was entitled "Macon Lee Almonrode: A Diary Project of One Student's Life at Tech." Lindsey conducted research in the TTU archives to study English major Macon Lee Almonrode's experience at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute in 1947-1950. She also created an interpretive diary through Macon's eyes about her personal life and what college would have been like for her as a female student in 1950.

In 2017, for the first time, ten English majors and English M.A. students presented their research at TTU Research and Creative Inquiry Day (formerly Student Research Day). Five English majors and four English M.A. students presented research papers in three panels at a special session featuring paper presentations in the Tech Pride Room on April 5. Another English major presented research from an Honors Colloquium at the poster session in the Hooper Eblen Center on April 6. Each participant's research paper abstract was printed in the event's program booklet, and every presenter received a T-shirt and was eligible for a prize for the best undergraduate or best graduate English project. English faculty members served as judges for the paper presentation competition. Awards were presented on April 6 at a ceremony at the Hooper Eblen Center.

(From left) English M.A. students Brandi Kriebel and Brittany Lynch presented critical papers at the New Voices Graduate Student Conference at Georgia State University, Atlanta, February 4, 2017. The conference theme was "What Is Home?" Brandi and Brittany received College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Travel Fund Awards to cover their conference and travel costs.

Both students developed their papers from essays they had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 6000 (Introduction to Graduate Studies) class.

Brandi, who is also a Graduate Teaching Assistant, presented "A False Sense of Home, Lack of Identity, and Other Injustices in Romeo and Juliet.”

Brittany presented “‘Forgetting any other home but this’: A Formalist Analysis of the Tomb as the True Home in Romeo and Juliet.”

English major Kelsey Taylor presented "Fulfilling Their Fate: Roman Mythological Allusions and Organic Unity in Romeo and Juliet" at The University of Virginia's College at Wise Medieval-Renaissance Conference, September 2016. Her conference and travel expenses were funded by an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URECA!) Student Travel Grant. 

Kelsey developed her paper from an essay she had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class.

Chelsea Mathes was awarded the William W. Jenkins Creative Writing Scholarship at an awards ceremony during the Department's Spring Fling celebration on April 21, 2016. She is pictured here with Dr. Ted Pelton, Chair, Department of English.

Other 2016 scholarship and award winners (not pictured) include:

  • La'Ken Brazzle, Kay Ballew Scholarship
  • Cassidy Laulo, William W. Jenkins Professional Communication Scholarship
  • Morgan Corlew, William W. Jenkins Theatre Scholarship
  • Elizabeth Rein, Lora A. Printz Poetry Prize and Clara Cox Epperson Prose Writing Award
  • Sarah Foy and Brittany Henley, William W. Jenkins English Scholarship
  • Rodrigo Duarte Bodewig, Carroll Viera Appreciation Scholarship
  • Kelsey Taylor, Charles Denson Daniel Memorial Scholarship
  • Mallory England, Robert F. Bode Memorial Scholarship in English
  • Saylah Johnson, Joan Barber Memorial Scholarship in English
  • William Arnold, Brittney Herman, Cassidy Laulo, Lauren Morgan, Laura Nealson, Whitney Stevens, and Kelsey Taylor, Sheila H. Officer Scholarship in English
English B.A. alumnus Nathan Strickland's article "Moll Flanders and Jane Eyre as Sorts of Conduct Novels" has been published in LURe: Literary Undergraduate Research, vol. 5, Fall 2015, pp. 65-69.

Nathan developed his article from a paper he had written in response to an assignment in Dr. McQuail's ENGL 4240 (Topics in British Literature after 1667) class.
English major Kimn Hinkson's short story "Frozen Zoo" has been chosen as the winner of the 2015 Gurney Norman Prize for Fiction at Limestone: Art. Prose. Poetry, a literary journal housed at the University of Kentucky. Kimn's story will appear in 2016 in Limestone's limited-edition, 30th anniversary issue. This competition was open to undergraduate students at an institution of higher education in an Appalachian state.
English B.A. and M.A. alumnus Charles Acheson's article, "Expanding the Role of the Gutter in Nonfiction Comics: Forged Memories in Joe Sacco's Safe Area Gorazde," has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Studies in the Novel, vol.47, no. 3, 2015, pp. 291-307. Charles first wrote his article in response to an assignment in Dr. Baker's ENGL 5650 (The Graphic Novel) class.

Whitney Stevens (left) and Kelsey Taylor (right) received the William W. Jenkins English Scholarship on April 23, 2015. They are pictured with Dr. Ted Pelton, Chair, Department of English.

Matthew Brown (not pictured) was awarded the William W. Jenkins Creative Writing Scholarship, and Matthew Hooper (not pictured) received the William W. Jenkins Theatre Scholarship.

Lindsey Pippin was awarded the William W. Jenkins Professional Communication Scholarship on April 23, 2015. She is pictured with Dr. Ted Pelton, Chair, Department of English, and Dr. Kristin Pickering, Professor of English.

Pictured (from left) are Ben Van Winkle, winner of the Lora A. Printz Memorial Poetry Prize; Dr. Ted Pelton, Chair, Department of English; Kimn Hinkson, recipient of the William W. Jenkins Creative Writing Scholarship; and Sheleah Gilly, winner of the Clara Cox Epperson Prose Writing Award. These awards were presented on April 23, 2015.

Blake Marlow, English M.A. Student and graduate teaching assistant, presented his critical paper, “Injustice in the Streets of Verona,” in a Tennessee Tech University panel on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet at the New Voices 2015 Graduate Student Conference at Georgia State University, Atlanta, February 2015. He received a College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Travel Fund Award to cover his conference and travel costs. 

Blake developed his paper from an essay he had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 6000 (Introduction to Graduate Studies) class.

English M.A. Student Merlin Jones presented a critical paper, “Juliet’s Nurse: An Intersection of Humor, Death, and Agency,” and chaired the Tennessee Tech University panel on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, at the New Voices 2015 Graduate Student Conference at Georgia State University, Atlanta, February 2015.

Merlin developed his paper from an essay he had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 6000 (Introduction to Graduate Studies) class.

Merlin also presented a second paper at the conference, "Breaking and Remaking the Rule of Threes in The Rocky Horror Picture Show."

English major Nathan Strickland presented "Feminism in London's Enlightenment Prophesies: Inheritance of Ideology from Mary Wollstonecraft and William Blake" at the Literary London Conference in London, England, July 2014.

CASS awards 2014

English Department Awards Ceremony, May 2014

Top left: Dr. Linda Null, Interim Chair, Department of English, with award winners Olivia Jolley, Lindsey Pippin, and Whitney Stevens

Top right: Whitney Stevens and Dean Paul Semmes

Bottom left: Dr. Linda Null

Bottom center: Olivia Jolley and Dean Paul Semmes

Bottom right: Lindsey Pippin and Dean Paul Semmes

Charles Acheson, English M.A. student and graduate teaching assistant, presented five different papers at five different conferences in five different states during the 2013-14 academic year.

In September, he presented "Kitsch as Dialogue in Art Spiegelman's Maus" at the 2013 MIX Symposium on Comics at the Columbus College of Art and Design in Ohio. In January, he traveled to Atlanta to present "Manifesting Monsters: Metaphorical Representation and Trauma in David B.'s Epileptic" at the New Voices Graduate Student Conference at Georgia State University. In February, he presented "Forged Memories: Closure and Traumatic Representation in Joe Sacco's Safe Area Gorazde" at the Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, at the University of Louisville. Later in February, he traveled to Nashville to present "The War Between the Lines in Joe Sacco's Safe Area Gorazde" at the Tennessee Philological Association 2014 Conference at Lipscomb University. And in April, he presented "Examining Traumatic Representation in the Graphic Nonfiction of Joe Sacco" at the 11th UF Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels in Gainesville at the University of Florida.

Charles developed several of these papers from essays he had written in response to assignments in Dr. Baker's ENGL 4650 and ENGL 5650 (The Graphic Novel) classes, as well as an essay written in response to an assignment in Dr. Williams's ENGL 6640 (Seminar in Twentieth-century American Literature) class. Other papers originated as chapters in Charles's M.A. Thesis, "Trauma Representations in the Graphic Nonfiction of Spiegelman, Sacco, and Beauchard," directed by Dr. Baker.

 

English M.A. student Christopher Vineyard presented his critical paper, "Where I'm Coming From: Raymond Carver's Departure from Minimalism," at the New Voices Graduate Student Conference at Georgia State University, Atlanta, February 2014. He received a College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Travel Fund Award to cover his conference and travel costs.

Christopher developed his paper from an essay he had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 6000 (Introduction to Graduate Studies) class.

English major Nathan Strickland presented "'Two lovely berries molded on one stem': Helena, Hermia, Inverted Sexuality, and Defense Mechanisms in A Midsummer Night's Dream" at The University of Virginia's College at Wise Medieval-Renaissance Conference, September 2013. His conference and travel expenses were funded by an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URECA!) Student Travel Grant. 

Nathan developed his paper from an essay he had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 3000 (Introduction to English Methods and Research) class.

Engscholarship winners 2013 English Department Awards Ceremony, May 2013

From left: Award winners Whitney Stevens, Olivia Jolley, Cody Matthews, Danielle Davis, Ai Lin Chin, Meaghan Hill, Patrick Stone, Drake Fenlon, and Katie Reasonover, with Dr. Linda Null, Interim Chair, Department of English

English major Justin Carnes presented "Choosing His Own Governor: John Milton's Tenure of Kings and Magistrates and Paradise Lost" at The University of Virginia's College at Wise Medieval-Renaissance Conference, September 2012. His conference and travel expenses were funded by an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URECA!) Student Travel Grant.

Justin developed his paper from an essay he had written in response to an assignment in Dr. Deiter's ENGL 4130 (Milton) class.