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College of Education

Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) Accreditation

CAEP accreditation includes undergraduate and graduate levels of professional education programs offered at Tennessee Tech.  Accreditation is the process by which the profession of teaching declares its expectations for teacher education and applies these expectations to institutions that prepare members of the profession.

CAEP establishes standards and procedures to carry out the accreditation process and provides training for those who conduct on-site review of higher education institutions. The essential function of external, national accreditation is to provide professional judgment of the quality of a teacher education program and to encourage continuous improvement in the program.

Institutions that are accredited nationally are required to provide quality professional education programs that foster competent practice by graduates of their programs. As a part of the accrediting process, the College of Education must meet rigorous standards of excellence developed by professional educators.

The College must demonstrate that its programs reflect established knowledge and sound professional practice, must establish and uphold national standards of excellence, and must strengthen the quality and integrity of professional education.

Through the accreditation process, CAEP provides assurance to the public that professionally accredited units have met national professional standards.


CAEP Standards

CAEP bylaws require a review of the CAEP Standards every seven years. The CAEP Research Committee was charged in 2018 with updating the research related to the CAEP Standards. The CAEP Board of Directors created a task force in June 2020, which spent months reviewing data and reports from the CAEP Research Committee and the CAEP Equity and Diversity Committee. The task force also reviewed US Department of Education (USDOE) and CHEA guidelines, more than 300 CAEP accreditation decisions, as well as feedback from stakeholders. It was composed of 21 representatives from the field of education, including P-12, higher education, state education departments and non-profit education organizations. The task force focused on reviewing the 2013 standards, specifically seeking to consolidate, clarify and streamline the standards.

In most cases the changes include the consolidation, clarification, and the removal of extraneous language. In addition, specific standards for technology have been added, given the increase in online learning. Equity and diversity measures have been specifically included in components of the standards to ensure proper attention is given and each provider must demonstrate progress toward recruiting and graduating a candidate pool that reflects the diversity of America’s P-12 students, as well as increased flexibility in documenting candidates academic knowledge and their impact on student learning and development.

CAEP Initial-Level Standards One-Pager

CAEP Advanced-Level Standards One-Pager

2022 CAEP Initial-Level Standards

  • Standard 1: Content Knowledge and Pedagogy

    The provider ensures that candidates develop, through curriculum and experiences, a deep understanding of the critical concepts and principles of their discipline that integrate equity and diversity throughout candidates' courses and their developmental clinical experiences with diverse P-12 students. Upon completion, candidates can use discipline-specific practices and understand student culture and differing needs to advance learning by all students.

    Components

    R1.1 The Learner and Learning

    The provider ensures candidates are able to apply their knowledge of the learner and learning at the appropriate progression levels.Evidence provided should demonstrate that candidates are able to apply critical concepts and principles of learner development (InTASC Standard 1), learning differences (InTASC Standard 2), and creating safe and supportive learning environments (InTASC Standard 3) in order to work effectively with diverse P-12 students and their families.

    R1.2 Content

    The provider ensures that candidates are able to apply their knowledge of content at the appropriate progression levels. Evidence provided demonstrates candidates know central concepts of their content area (InTASC Standard 4) and are able to apply the content in developing equitable and inclusive learning experiences (InTASC Standard 5) for diverse P-12 students. Outcome data can be provided from a Specialized Professional Associations SPA process, a state review process, or an evidence review of Standard 1.

    R1.3 Instructional Practice

    The provider ensures that candidates are able to apply their knowledge of InTASC standards relating to instructional practice at the appropriate progression levels. Evidence demonstrates how candidates are able to assess (InTASC Standard 6), plan for instruction (InTASC Standard 7), and utilize a variety of instructional strategies (InTASC Standard 8) to provide equitable and inclusive learning experiences for diverse P-12 students. Providers ensure that candidates model and apply national or state approved technology standards to engage and improve learning for all students.

    R1.4 Professional Responsibility

    The provider ensures candidates are able to apply their knowledge of professional responsibility at the appropriate progression levels. Evidence provided should demonstrate candidates engage in professional learning, act ethically (InTASC Standard 9), take responsibility for student learning and collaborate with others (InTASC Standard 10) to work effectively with diverse P-12 students and their families.

  • Standard 2: Clinical Partnerships and Practice

    The provider ensures effective partnerships and high-quality clinical practice are central to candidate preparation. These experiences should be designed to develop candidate’s knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to demonstrate positive impact on diverse students’ learning and development. High quality clinical practice offers candidates experiences in different settings and modalities, as well as with diverse P-12 students, schools, families, and communities. Partners share responsibility to identify and address real problems of practice candidates experience in their engagement with P-12 students.

    Components

    R2.1 Partnerships for Clinical Preparation

    Partners co-construct mutually beneficial P-12 school and community arrangements for clinical preparation and share responsibility for continuous improvement of candidate preparation.

    R2.2 Clinical Educators

    Partners co-select, prepare, evaluate, and support high-quality clinical educators, both provider- and school-based, who demonstrate a positive impact on candidates’ development and diverse P-12 student learning and development.

    R2.3 Clinical Experiences

    The provider works with partners to design and implement clinical experiences, utilizing various modalities, of sufficient depth, breadth, diversity, coherence, and duration to ensure that candidates demonstrate their developing effectiveness and positive impact on diverse P-12 students’ learning and development as presented in Standard R1.

  • Standard 3: Candidate Recruitment, Progression, and Support

    The provider demonstrates that the quality of candidates is a continuous and purposeful focus from recruitment through completion. The provider demonstrates that development of candidate quality is the goal of educator preparation and that the EPP provides support services (such as advising, remediation, and mentoring) in all phases of the program so candidates will be successful.

    Components

    R3.1 Recruitment

    The provider presents goals and progress evidence for recruitment of high-quality candidates from a broad range of backgrounds and diverse populations that align with their mission. The provider demonstrates efforts to know and address state, national, regional, or local needs for hard-to-staff schools and shortage fields. The goals and evidence should address progress towards a candidate pool which reflects the diversity of America’s P-12 students.

     

    R3.2 Monitoring and Supporting Candidate Progression

    The provider creates and monitors transition points from admission through completion that indicate candidates’ developing content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical skills, critical dispositions, and professional responsibilities, and the ability to integrate technology effectively in their practice. The provider identifies a transition point at any point in the program when a cohort grade point average of 3.0 is achieved and monitors this data. The provider ensures knowledge of and progression through transition points are transparent to candidates. The provider plans and documents the need for candidate support, as identified in disaggregated data by race and ethnicity and such other categories as may be relevant for the EPP’s mission, so candidates meet milestones. The provider has a system for effectively maintaining records of candidate complaints, including complaints made to CAEP, and documents the resolution.

     

    R3.3 Competency at Completion

    The provider ensures candidates possess academic competency to teach effectively with positive impacts on diverse P-12 student learning and development through application of content knowledge, foundational pedagogical skills, and technology integration in the field(s) where certification is sought. Multiple measures are provided and data are disaggregated and analyzed based on race, ethnicity, and such other categories as may be relevant for the EPP’s mission.

  • Standard 4: Program Impact

    The provider demonstrates the effectiveness of its completers’ instruction on P-12 student learning and development, and completer and employer satisfaction with the relevance and effectiveness of preparation.

    Components


    R4.1 Completer Effectiveness 

    The provider demonstrates that program completers: A. effectively contribute to P-12 student-learning growth AND B. apply in P-12 classrooms the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions the preparation experiences were designed to achieve. In addition, the provider includes a rationale for the data elements provided.

    R4.2 Satisfaction of Employers

    The provider demonstrates that employers are satisfied with the completers’ preparation for their assigned responsibilities in working with diverse P-12 students and their families.

    R4.3 Satisfaction of Completers

    The provider demonstrates program completers perceive their preparation as relevant to the responsibilities they encounter on the job, and their preparation was effective.

  • Standard 5: Quality Assurance System and Continuous Improvement

    The provider maintains a quality assurance system that consists of valid data from multiple measures and supports continuous improvement that is sustained and evidence-based. The system is developed and maintained with input from internal and external stakeholders. The provider uses the results of inquiry and data collection to establish priorities, enhance program elements, establish goals for improving, and highlight innovations.

    Components


    R5.1 Quality Assurance System

    The provider has developed, implemented, and modified, as needed, a functioning quality assurance system that ensures a sustainable process to document operational effectiveness. The provider documents how data enter the system, how data are reported and used in decision making, and how the outcomes of those decisions inform programmatic improvement.

    R5.2 Data Quality

    The provider’s quality assurance system from R5.1 relies on relevant, verifiable, representative, cumulative, and actionable measures to ensure interpretations of data are valid and consistent.

    R5.3 Stakeholder Involvement

    The provider includes relevant internal (e.g., EPP administrators, faculty, staff, candidates) and external (e.g., alumni, practitioners, school and community partners, employers stakeholders in program evaluation and continuous improvement processes.

    R5.4 Continuous Improvement

    The provider regularly, systematically, and continuously assesses performance against its goals and relevant standards, tracks results over time, documents modifications and/or innovations and their effects on EPP outcomes.

  • Standard 6: Fiscal and Administrative Capacity

    The EPP has the fiscal and administrative capacity, faculty, infrastructure (facilities, equipment, and supplies) and other resources as appropriate to the scale of its operations and as necessary for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and institutional standards. For EPPs whose institution is accredited by an accreditor recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education (e.g., SACSCOC, HLC), such accreditation will be considered sufficient evidence of compliance with Standard.6. If an EPP's institution is not accredited by an accreditor recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education, the EPP must address each component of Standard 6 in narrative supported by evidence.

    Components


    R6.1 Fiscal Resources The EPP has the fiscal capacity as appropriate to the scale of its operations. The budget for curriculum, instruction, faculty, clinical work, scholarship, etc.,supports high-quality work within the EPP and its school partners for the preparation of professional educators.

    R6.2 Administrative Capacity The EPP has administrative capacity as appropriate to the scale of its operations, including leadership and authority to plan, deliver, and operate coherent programs of study so that their candidates are prepared to meet all standards. Academic calendars, catalogs, publications, grading policies, and advertising are current,accurate, and transparent.

    R6.3 Faculty Resources The EPP has professional education faculty that have earned doctorates or equivalent P-12 teaching experience that qualifies them for their assignments.The EPP provides adequate resources and opportunities for professional development of faculty, including training in the use of technology.

    R6.4 Infrastructure The EPP has adequate campus and school facilities, equipment, and supplies to support candidates in meeting standards. The infrastructure supports faculty and candidate use of information technology in instruction.

  • Standard 7: Record of Compliance with Title IV of the Higher Education Act

    Freestanding EPPs relying on CAEP accreditation to access Title IV of the Higher Education Act must demonstrate 100% compliance with their responsibilities under Title IV of the Act, including but not limited to on the basis of student loan default rate data provided by the Secretary, financial and compliance audits, and program reviews conducted by the U.S. Department of Education. Freestanding EPPs will need to provide narrative and evidence for all components of Standard 7.

2022 CAEP Advanced-Level Standards

  • Standard 1: Content and Pedagogical Knowledge

    The provider ensures that candidates develop, through curriculum and experiences, a deep understanding of the critical concepts and principles of their discipline that integrate equity and diversity throughout candidates' courses and their developmental clinical experiences with diverse P-12 students. Upon completion, candidates can use discipline-specific practices and understand student culture and differing needs to advance learning by all students.

    Components

    R1.1 The Learner and Learning

    The provider ensures candidates are able to apply their knowledge of the learner and learning at the appropriate progression levels.Evidence provided should demonstrate that candidates are able to apply critical concepts and principles of learner development (InTASC Standard 1), learning differences (InTASC Standard 2), and creating safe and supportive learning environments (InTASC Standard 3) in order to work effectively with diverse P-12 students and their families.

    R1.2 Content

    The provider ensures that candidates are able to apply their knowledge of content at the appropriate progression levels. Evidence provided demonstrates candidates know central concepts of their content area (InTASC Standard 4) and are able to apply the content in developing equitable and inclusive learning experiences (InTASC Standard 5) for diverse P-12 students. Outcome data can be provided from a Specialized Professional Associations SPA process, a state review process, or an evidence review of Standard 1.

    R1.3 Instructional Practice

    The provider ensures that candidates are able to apply their knowledge of InTASC standards relating to instructional practice at the appropriate progression levels. Evidence demonstrates how candidates are able to assess (InTASC Standard 6), plan for instruction (InTASC Standard 7), and utilize a variety of instructional strategies (InTASC Standard 8) to provide equitable and inclusive learning experiences for diverse P-12 students. Providers ensure that candidates model and apply national or state approved technology standards to engage and improve learning for all students.

    R1.4 Professional Responsibility

    The provider ensures candidates are able to apply their knowledge of professional responsibility at the appropriate progression levels. Evidence provided should demonstrate candidates engage in professional learning, act ethically (InTASC Standard 9), take responsibility for student learning and collaborate with others (InTASC Standard 10) to work effectively with diverse P-12 students and their families.

  • Standard 2: Clinical Partnerships and Practice

    The provider ensures effective partnerships and high-quality clinical practice are central to candidate preparation. These experiences should be designed to develop candidate’s knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to demonstrate positive impact on diverse students’ learning and development. High quality clinical practice offers candidates experiences in different settings and modalities, as well as with diverse P-12 students, schools, families, and communities. Partners share responsibility to identify and address real problems of practice candidates experience in their engagement with P-12 students.

    Components

    R2.1 Partnerships for Clinical Preparation

    Partners co-construct mutually beneficial P-12 school and community arrangements for clinical preparation and share responsibility for continuous improvement of candidate preparation.

    R2.2 Clinical Educators

    Partners co-select, prepare, evaluate, and support high-quality clinical educators, both provider- and school-based, who demonstrate a positive impact on candidates’ development and diverse P-12 student learning and development.

    R2.3 Clinical Experiences

    The provider works with partners to design and implement clinical experiences, utilizing various modalities, of sufficient depth, breadth, diversity, coherence, and duration to ensure that candidates demonstrate their developing effectiveness and positive impact on diverse P-12 students’ learning and development as presented in Standard R1.

  • Standard 3: Candidate Recruitment, Progression, and Support

    The provider demonstrates that the quality of candidates is a continuous and purposeful focus from recruitment through completion. The provider demonstrates that development of candidate quality is the goal of educator preparation and that the EPP provides support services (such as advising, remediation, and mentoring) in all phases of the program so candidates will be successful.

    Components

    R3.1 Recruitment

    The provider presents goals and progress evidence for recruitment of high-quality candidates from a broad range of backgrounds and diverse populations that align with their mission. The provider demonstrates efforts to know and address state, national, regional, or local needs for hard-to-staff schools and shortage fields. The goals and evidence should address progress towards a candidate pool which reflects the diversity of America’s P-12 students.

     

    R3.2 Monitoring and Supporting Candidate Progression

    The provider creates and monitors transition points from admission through completion that indicate candidates’ developing content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical skills, critical dispositions, and professional responsibilities, and the ability to integrate technology effectively in their practice. The provider identifies a transition point at any point in the program when a cohort grade point average of 3.0 is achieved and monitors this data. The provider ensures knowledge of and progression through transition points are transparent to candidates. The provider plans and documents the need for candidate support, as identified in disaggregated data by race and ethnicity and such other categories as may be relevant for the EPP’s mission, so candidates meet milestones. The provider has a system for effectively maintaining records of candidate complaints, including complaints made to CAEP, and documents the resolution.

     

    R3.3 Competency at Completion

    The provider ensures candidates possess academic competency to teach effectively with positive impacts on diverse P-12 student learning and development through application of content knowledge, foundational pedagogical skills, and technology integration in the field(s) where certification is sought. Multiple measures are provided and data are disaggregated and analyzed based on race, ethnicity, and such other categories as may be relevant for the EPP’s mission.

  • Standard 4: Program Impact

    The provider demonstrates the effectiveness of its completers’ instruction on P-12 student learning and development, and completer and employer satisfaction with the relevance and effectiveness of preparation.

    Components

    R4.1 Completer Effectiveness 

    The provider demonstrates that program completers: A. effectively contribute to P-12 student-learning growth AND B. apply in P-12 classrooms the professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions the preparation experiences were designed to achieve. In addition, the provider includes a rationale for the data elements provided.

    R4.2 Satisfaction of Employers

    The provider demonstrates that employers are satisfied with the completers’ preparation for their assigned responsibilities in working with diverse P-12 students and their families.

    R4.3 Satisfaction of Completers

    The provider demonstrates program completers perceive their preparation as relevant to the responsibilities they encounter on the job, and their preparation was effective.

  • Standard 5: Quality Assurance System and Continuous Improvement

    The provider maintains a quality assurance system that consists of valid data from multiple measures and supports continuous improvement that is sustained and evidence-based. The system is developed and maintained with input from internal and external stakeholders. The provider uses the results of inquiry and data collection to establish priorities, enhance program elements, establish goals for improving, and highlight innovations.

    Components

    R5.1 Quality Assurance System

    The provider has developed, implemented, and modified, as needed, a functioning quality assurance system that ensures a sustainable process to document operational effectiveness. The provider documents how data enter the system, how data are reported and used in decision making, and how the outcomes of those decisions inform programmatic improvement.

    R5.2 Data Quality

    The provider’s quality assurance system from R5.1 relies on relevant, verifiable, representative, cumulative, and actionable measures to ensure interpretations of data are valid and consistent.

    R5.3 Stakeholder Involvement

    The provider includes relevant internal (e.g., EPP administrators, faculty, staff, candidates) and external (e.g., alumni, practitioners, school and community partners, employers stakeholders in program evaluation and continuous improvement processes.

    R5.4 Continuous Improvement

    The provider regularly, systematically, and continuously assesses performance against its goals and relevant standards, tracks results over time, documents modifications and/or innovations and their effects on EPP outcomes.

  • Standard 6: Fiscal and Administrative Capacity

    The EPP has the fiscal and administrative capacity, faculty, infrastructure (facilities, equipment, and supplies) and other resources as appropriate to the scale of its operations and as necessary for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and institutional standards. For EPPs whose institution is accredited by an accreditor recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education (e.g., SACSCOC, HLC), such accreditation will be considered sufficient evidence of compliance with Standard.6. If an EPP's institution is not accredited by an accreditor recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education, the EPP must address each component of Standard 6 in narrative supported by evidence.

    Components

    R6.1 Fiscal Resources The EPP has the fiscal capacity as appropriate to the scale of its operations. The budget for curriculum, instruction, faculty, clinical work, scholarship, etc.,supports high-quality work within the EPP and its school partners for the preparation of professional educators.

    R6.2 Administrative Capacity The EPP has administrative capacity as appropriate to the scale of its operations, including leadership and authority to plan, deliver, and operate coherent programs of study so that their candidates are prepared to meet all standards. Academic calendars, catalogs, publications, grading policies, and advertising are current,accurate, and transparent.

    R6.3 Faculty Resources The EPP has professional education faculty that have earned doctorates or equivalent P-12 teaching experience that qualifies them for their assignments.The EPP provides adequate resources and opportunities for professional development of faculty, including training in the use of technology.

    R6.4 Infrastructure The EPP has adequate campus and school facilities, equipment, and supplies to support candidates in meeting standards. The infrastructure supports faculty and candidate use of information technology in instruction.

  • Standard 7: Record of Compliance with Title IV of the Higher Education Act

    Freestanding EPPs relying on CAEP accreditation to access Title IV of the Higher Education Act must demonstrate 100% compliance with their responsibilities under Title IV of the Act, including but not limited to on the basis of student loan default rate data provided by the Secretary, financial and compliance audits, and program reviews conducted by the U.S. Department of Education. Freestanding EPPs will need to provide narrative and evidence for all components of Standard 7.


CAEP-ACCREDITED - Specialty Area Programs

Initial Programs

Agriculture Education/Agriscience 6-12 (dual endorsement)

Interventionist 6-12

Biology 6-12

Interventionist K-8

Chemistry 6-12

Mathematics 6-12

Computer Science K-12

Middle Grades ELA 6-8

Early Childhood Education PreK-3

Middle Grades Math 6-8

Early Childhood Education PreK-3; Special Ed: Preschool/Early Childhood Education PreK-3 (dual endorsement)

Middle Grades Science 6-8

Earth Science 6-12

Middle Grades Social Studies 6-8

Economics 6-12

Occupational -- All Occupational areas

Elementary Education K-5

Physical Education K-12

English 6-12

Physical Education K-12; Health & Wellness (dual endorsement)

English as a Second Language PreK-12

Physics 6-12

Family & Consumer Science 6-12

Spanish 6-12

Family & Consumer Science 6-12; Early Childhood Care & Services 9-12 (dual)

Special Education: Comprehensive K-12

Family & Consumer Science 6-12; Food Production & Management Services 9-12 (dual)

Special Education: Comprehensive K-12; Interventionist K-8 (dual endorsement)

French 6-12

Special Education: Preschool/Early Childhood Education PreK-3   

Geography 6-12

Speech Communication 6-12

German 6-12

Speech Communication 6-12/Theatre K-12 (dual endorsement)

Government 6-12

Theatre K-12

Health & Wellness

Visual Arts K-12

History 6-12

Vocal/General Music K-12

Instrumental/General Music K-12

 

Advanced Programs

Instructional Leader PreK-12

Library Information Specialist PreK-12

Reading Specialist PreK-12

School Counselor PreK-12

School Psychologist PreK-12


CAEP Accountability Measures

The Annual Accreditation Report (Annual Report) process, is used to monitor and evaluate an educator preparation provider's (EPP) continued compliance with CAEP standards. The annual monitoring and evaluation expectations of accredited EPPs are periodically revisited, as appropriate, to meet the requirements of CAEP policy, recognition guidelines of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), and federal accreditor recognition requirements.

The following sections contain information and data related to accountability measures as define by CAEP.  This information is collected annually via a variety of data sources. For more information on each CAEP accountability measure, please click on the appropriate section below.

  • Measure 1 - Completer Effectiveness

    The State of Tennessee and Tennessee Tech University track, monitor, and measure the impact of our teachers on student learning, growth, and development. Below are measures that are used to assess this impact. This data is used to inform college-wide as well as programmatic improvement within the College of Education.

    Measures

    Teacher effectiveness is measured by the State of Tennessee and Tennessee Tech University in a few ways that are explained in the sections below.

    Tennessee Value-Added Assessment (TVAAS)

    The first way is via the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System (TVAAS). TVAAS measures the impact that teachers have on their students' academic progress. Rather than measuring proficiency, TVAAS specifically captures student growth so as to better represent the effect that teachers and schools can have on students. TVAAS is scored from levels 1-5. Levels 1 and 2 indicate that a teacher's students are making less than expected growth, Level 3 indicates that students are making expected growth, and Levels 4 and 5 indicate that students are exceeding expected growth.

    In the most recent State of TN Report Card (2021), Tennessee Tech University had 63.2% (n = 133) of cohort members score at Level 3 or above and 21.8% (n = 133) score at Level 4 or above on TVAAS. This was above the state averages of 61.3% and 20.2%, respectively.

    A detailed breakdown and disaggregated data can be found on the Tennessee State Board of Education website.

    Level of Overall Effectiveness (LOE)

    The State of Tennessee also measures completer effectiveness using a metric called the Level of Overall Effectiveness (LOE). LOE scores include multiple measures of a teacher's performance in the classroom, including classroom observation scores and TVAAS scores. This metric reports the percentage of cohort members who earned a level of overall effectiveness and includes a scale from 1-5 where a score of 3 indicates "At Expectations" and a score of 4 indicated "Above Expectations".

    In the most recent State of TN Report Card (2021), Tennessee Tech University had 96.8% (n = 777) of cohort members score at Level 3 or above and 61.9% (n = 777) score at Level 4 or above on LOE. This was above the state averages of 95.3% and 61.20%, respectively.

    A detailed breakdown and disaggregated data can be found on the Tennessee State Board of Education website.

    Previous years measures of teaching effectiveness are available:

    2020 Measures of Completer Effectiveness 

    2019 Measures of Completer Effectiveness

  • Measure 2 - Satisfaction of Employers and Stakeholder Involvement

    Stakeholder Involvement

    The College of Education at Tennessee Tech gathers internal stakeholder feedback and program design/evaluation recommendations on a continual basis. Once gathered, this feedback is summarized and presented to two decision-making bodes within the College of Education, the Executive Leadership Council (ELC) and the Teacher Education Committee (TEC). Both bodies evaluate relevant feedback and make recommendations based on existing data and current/future trends (e.g., enrollment, employment trends, etc). Here is a link to a summary of the ELC and TEC decisions made in AY 20-21.

    Additional data for Measure 2 will come from a College-wide internal stakeholder survey that is currently being developed. A pilot of the survey will be conducted in the Fall 2022 semester. Initial data from the pilot will be reported and added to the website in Spring 2023. 

    Employer Feedback

    Employer feedback is gathered primarily through surveys. The employer survey was not distributed during AY 2020-2021 due to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Additionally, the employer survey instrument was reviewed and updated in AY 2021-2022. Data from the 2022-2023 distribution of the survey (Fall 2022) using the updated employer survey instrument will be posted on the website in Spring 2023.  

    2019-2020 Employer Feedback

  • Measure 3 - Candidate Competency at Completion

    The Tennessee Educator Preparation Report Card provides a public view of the competencies of Tennessee Tech's candidates, as measured by multiple assessments required to obtain a teacher or leader licensure. Tennessee Tech exceeded expectations on the 2021 TN Report Card in the area of candidate assessment, which is comprised of pedagogical assessment pass rate and content assessment pass rate.

    For the 2020-2021 academic year, 98.1% of Tennessee Tech University teacher candidates passed the Praxis Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) or edTPA, 89.8% passed the Praxis Subject Area assessment(s), and 98% of teacher candidates passed the Praxis Literacy Instruction assessment. 

    For the 2020-2021 Academic Year, 90.1% of our Instructional leadership candidates passed the Praxis School Leaders Licensure Assessment, demonstrating that they have the competencies to lead schools at program completion. More information is available in the Tennessee Tech Leader Preparation Program Report Card.

    Previous years measures of candidate competency at completion are available:

    2020 Measures of Candidate Competency at Completion

    2019 Measures of Candidate Competency at Completion

    Title II Pass Rates:

    2021 Title II 3-Year Pass Rate on Qualifying Exams of Completers - Traditional Preparation

    2021 Title II 3-Year Pass Rate on Qualifying Exams of Completers - Alternative Preparation

  • Measure 4 - Ability of Completers to be Hired

    Information about Tennessee Tech's teacher candidates and their resulting employment in Tennessee public schools is collected and reported through the Tennessee State Board of Education Report Card. The report card includes important teacher retention metrics such as first-year employment in Tennessee public schools as well as second and third year retention rates. 

    The rate of first-year employment in Tennessee public schools reports the percentage of cohort members who were employed in Tennessee public schools within one year of completing their preparation program or within one year of enrolling in a job-embedded program. Additionally, the second and third year retention rates report the percentage of first-year employed cohort members who remained teaching in TN public schools for a second and third year, respectively. 

    In the most recent report card, Tennessee Tech reported a rate of first-year employment in Tennessee public schools of 79.7%, which is higher than the state average of 76.8%. Tennessee Tech also had higher reported second (94.4%) and third year (86.2%) retention rate when compared to the state averages of 92.9% and 81.1%, respectively.  Overall, Tennessee Tech "Exceeds Expectations" in the area of candidate employment on the 2021 State of Tennessee Report Card. 

    A detailed breakdown of these metrics can be viewed in the 2021 Employment and Retention section of the report card.

    Employment locations of Tennessee Tech's recent completers and job-embedded candidates can be found on the Tennessee State Board of Education's website (2021).

    Previous years measures of employment and retention are available:

    2020 Employment and Retention

    2019 Employment and Retention

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